NBC News reports that the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is asking some recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program to return their three-year work permits. Last year, President Obama announced he would expand DACA to benefit more immigrants and extend it for a period of three years instead of two. But a federal district court in Texas granted a preliminary injunction on in February that temporarily blocked Obama’s recent executive actions on immigration. In a statement to NBC News, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) said it discovered that a group of approximately 2,000 individuals had been “erroneously” issued three-year instead of two-year employment authorization documents (EAD) after the Texas ruling. “USCIS is notifying these individuals, instructing them to return their three-year EAD, and replacing them with a two-year EAD,” USCIS said in a statement.

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Buzzfeed reports that thousands of undocumented immigrants who gained work permits as part of an Obama administration effort to shield young people from deportation are suddenly losing their ability to work legally as the federal government struggles to renew their authorizations on time. Exactly 11,028 young immigrants have had their Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) status and work permits expire in spite of having applied on time, according to numbers released for the first time to BuzzFeed News by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). The number of lapsed cases represents roughly 5% of the total number of DACA renewals that USCIS has approved so far.

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The Hill reports that the Obama administration granted about 100,000 expanded work permits to undocumented immigrants under the president’s executive actions before a federal court blocked the new policies.

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The International Business Times reports that immigration officials are no longer screening out undocumented immigrants who may be eligible for deportation relief under President Obama’s most recent executive action, following a Texas judge’s injunction last week on the deferred-action programs.

The Obama administration released several memos in November outlining a slate of new immigration policies in light of the deferred-action programs, DAPA (Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Long-Term Residents) and an expansion of DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals). One of those directives instructed Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents to identify any immigrants in custody who may be eligible for deferred action under these new programs, and close their cases.

But on Feb. 17, a Texas federal judge temporarily halted the executive action, pending resolution of a lawsuit challenging the deferred-action programs. ICE officials confirmed to International Business Times that it was no longer taking eligibility of DAPA or the expanded DACA into consideration when dealing with unauthorized immigration cases.

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Bloomberg reports that President Obama has vowed to appeal the order by Judge Andrew Hanen that would delay expanding a program to shield 5 million undocumented child immigrants from deportation, saying in the meantime the U.S. won’t be taking some new applications for deferred deportation from immigrants brought to the country as children. He said the White House would prevail in court.

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The Los Angeles Times reports that Homeland Security (DHS) Chief Jeh Johnson has asked immigrants in Los Angeles to “step forward” and apply for President Obama’s expanded deferred action program (DACA).

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NBC News reports that President Obama met Tuesday with a handful of young immigrants to hear how much he’s helped them and to reassure them he’d veto legislation to deport them. The young immigrants who met with him had benefited from a 2012 action Obama took granting relief from deportation through the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. Beyond taking them off the deportation list, the action also allowed many young immigrants to work legally. Action Obama took late last year allows more young immigrants here illegally to apply, beginning Feb. 18, for three years of deportation relief and work permits. It also would allow parents of U.S. citizen and legal resident children to apply for similar benefits, known as DAPA.

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The New York Times reports that the U.S. will begin accepting applications on Feb. 18 for temporary legal status from children of undocumented immigrants who came to the United States with their parents, under a plan announced by President Barack Obama last November. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) said on Thursday the applications for the program to defer deportation and obtain a 3-year legal status would be available to undocumented immigrants who entered the country as children before 2010.

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U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has issued a reminder that if you request either initial or renewal Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), you must submit Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization and required fees. USCIS will reject your request if you fail to submit Form I-765, the required filing fee, Form I-765 Worksheet, and Form I-821D, Consideration of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

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The Associated Press (AP) reports that President Obama’s executive order to spare some immigrants from deportation has inspired Democrats, immigration groups and public health advocates in California to push for expanding health care coverage to a segment of the population that remains uninsured. Immigrant and advocates say that, in accordance with state law, Obama’s order will enable hundreds of thousands of low-income so-called “dreamer” immigrants in California to apply for Medi-Cal, California’s version of Medicaid.

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