Bloomberg reports that President Obama has vowed to appeal the order by Judge Andrew Hanen that would delay expanding a program to shield 5 million undocumented child immigrants from deportation, saying in the meantime the U.S. won’t be taking some new applications for deferred deportation from immigrants brought to the country as children. He said the White House would prevail in court.

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The Chicago Tribune reports that a federal judge in Texas on Monday temporarily blocked President Obama’s executive action on immigration, giving a coalition of 26 states time to pursue a lawsuit that aims to permanently stop the orders. U.S. District Judge Andrew Hanen’s decision comes after a hearing in Brownsville, Texas, in January. It puts on hold Obama’s orders that could spare as many as five million people who are in the U.S. illegally from deportation.

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The New York Times reports that the U.S. will begin accepting applications on Feb. 18 for temporary legal status from children of undocumented immigrants who came to the United States with their parents, under a plan announced by President Barack Obama last November. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) said on Thursday the applications for the program to defer deportation and obtain a 3-year legal status would be available to undocumented immigrants who entered the country as children before 2010.

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The Hill reports that attorney generals from 12 states- California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Vermont and the District of Columbia- are backing President Obama’s immigration actions by filing a “friend of the court” brief to defend the policies in a lawsuit filed by more than 20 other states. Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson, who leads the charge, filed the brief in a Texas federal court on Monday. “By properly using his authority to set enforcement priorities, the president’s action benefits Washington and other states by improving public safety, keeping families together, and aiding our economy,” Ferguson said in a statement.

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The Associated Press (AP) reports that President Obama’s executive order to spare some immigrants from deportation has inspired Democrats, immigration groups and public health advocates in California to push for expanding health care coverage to a segment of the population that remains uninsured. Immigrant and advocates say that, in accordance with state law, Obama’s order will enable hundreds of thousands of low-income so-called “dreamer” immigrants in California to apply for Medi-Cal, California’s version of Medicaid.

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The Washington Post (WP) reports that, under President Obama’s new program to protect millions of illegal immigrants from deportation, many of those affected will be eligible to receive Social Security, Medicare and a variety of other federal benefits, a White House official confirmed. For those who work, that includes payroll taxes, also known as FICA taxes, because they are collected under the Federal Insurance Contributions Act. The President did note, however, that the estimated 5 million immigrants granted protection from deportation will not be eligible for other federal benefits, such as student financial aid, food stamps and housing subsidies, nor are they eligible to purchase health insurance through the federal health care exchange under the Affordable Care Act.

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ABC News reports that President Obama’s executive actions on immigration disappointed many business leaders who may have backed the new policies had they not left out some of the business community’s top priorities, such as allotting available but unused green cards to high-tech businesses in need of high-skilled foreign workers. The administration only partially answered pleas to increase the length of time foreign students can stay in the U.S. before or after graduating to work in their fields, announcing plans to expand the program at some point in the future, but offering no details on timing or scope.

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CNN reports that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has released a memo further clarifying President Obama’s vow to make it “easier and faster” for foreign entrepreneurs to work in the U.S., primarily featuring a new opportunity regarding parole status, which is typically granted for humanitarian purposes as a way to enter the country without a visa, and is now being proposed to enable inventors, researchers and startup owners to legally enter the U.S. for an unspecified period of time.

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Bloomberg reports that President Obama’s immigration plan to keep highly skilled immigrant workers in the U.S. as well as deportation protection for an estimated 5 million undocumented parents of U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents also includes provisions to increase job portability for immigrants with approved employment-based petitions who can’t get visas because of annual caps, expansion of the optional practical training program, a review of the permanent labor certification program, and guidance on L-1B intracompany transferee visas for “specialized knowledge” workers. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is also about to publish a final rule granting work authorization to H-4 dependent spouses of H-1B highly skilled guestworkers who are in the process of obtaining lawful permanent residence through employment.

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U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) reports that, on November 20th, 2014, the President announced a series of executive actions to crack down on illegal immigration at the border, prioritize deporting felons not families, and require certain undocumented immigrants to pass a criminal background check and pay taxes in order to temporarily stay in the U.S. without fear of deportation.

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